Eggs

 

Double Yolkers 

are eggs which are a fluke of nature, a hen laying an egg with two yolks in it? (Normally by young hens)

that they are now being packaged specially in boxes sold as ‘Double Yolkers’?

that chickens hatches an egg every 24 hours?

that it drops the egg yolk, goes down the tube, collects egg white on the way, lands in ‘shelling compartment’ where it stays for about 18 hours, and then the egg is laid.

which reminded me of the whole shelled egg in another shelled egg, another fluke of nature. (Link please!)

It is an egg which has two yolks in it. Both yolks were ovulated (released) at or about the same time and enclosed in the same shell. Many eggs with double yolks occur when young adult female chickens first start producing eggs. Their egg-forming organs are not adjusted or not yet synchronized, so two yolks are released together. Shortly after egg production starts, the chickens’ bodies adjust, and for the most part, they then lay eggs with only one yolk. But, there are some chickens which inherit the characteristic to lay double-yolked eggs and usually continue to do so throughout their life.

Hahaha Eggs!

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No Yolk

Sometimes there are no-yolk eggs, which are referred to as dwarf or wind eggs. This generally happens when a pullet first produces. If it happens when a mature hen lays an egg, this is usually the result of reproductive tissues breaking away and stimulating the egg-producing glands to treat the tissue as if it were a yolk. It is wrapped in albumen, membranes and a shell, and travels through the egg tube. The egg contains grayish tissue rather than a yolk.

 

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